Case Study: Navigating Complex Projects

Case Study: Navigating Complex Projects

Navigating Complex Projects with Map Day and GoWall

 

A project manager needed to launch a project that required several teams to get it done. The business wanted the project completed quickly for one of their largest customers, but the teams responsible for the launch were concerned about resources, timelines and costs. The teams had no experience working together, and some were remote.

 

Using Map Day project management methodology and GoWall, the project manager took a top-down and bottom-up approach to determine who needed to deliver what to whom so the project could stay on track and keep the customer satisfied.

 

The project manager mobilized the group this way:

  • Brought together representatives of every team involved in the project (including remote teams via video conference).
  • Reviewed the scope, requirements and expected benefits of the project.
  • Reviewed the high-level (top-down) schedule and major milestone (including definitions and measures).
  • Scheduled presentations by the teams that were responsible for the deliverables and asked them what they expected to complete, and what receivables they needed to do their work.
  • Completed a mapping exercise (using GoWall) where all the deliverables and receivables were identified and matched.
  • Formalized team agreement on what, when and how the deliverables would be completed.
  • Reviewed existing risks and issues and identified new ones.
  • Documented priority of tasks, deliverables and receivables.

 

In previous Map Day sessions, the project manager used sticky notes to capture the ideas of people in the room, which would be manually keyed into a document… eventually. That approach wouldn’t work for this meeting—remote teams would have been isolated and unable to share their input.

 

By using GoWall, everyone—including remote teams—could participate and the meeting flourished. The facilitator addressed key points and drilled down into more specific topics. Participants, including the remote team, could “like,” prioritize, and flag notes instantly. They grouped and mapped the notes by what had to be delivered and what needed to be received for delivery to happen. They ensured alignment between deliverables and receivables, dates and content. Best of all, the project manager exported all the notes to a spreadsheet after the meeting and sent it to everyone for immediate action.

 

Using Map Day methodology combined with GoWall provided reconciliation between top down guidance and bottom up planning. The lead product manager said, “The combination was incredibly useful and provided instant and valuable insight into project risks and issues. It meant that the expectations of the management team, and our commitment for deliverables and dates, were completely aligned.”

 

Results (by the numbers):